Exercise 2.1: Identify the Authors’ Main Ideas

Objective: to identify the main ideas in Judith Williamson’s Decoding Advertisements and Stuart Hall’s “The West and the Rest: Discourse and Power.”

Estimated time: 1-2 hours
Due by: 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, March 4th

Part 1—Viewing  and Reading

  1. Watch the “Ferdinand de Saussure and Structural Linguistics” video.
  2. Re-watch the Stuart Hall – Race, Gender, Class in the Media Al Jazeera video again if you need a refresher.
  3. Read the Decoding Advertisements: Ideology and Meaning in Advertising excerpt by Judith Williamson.
  4. Read your annotations from “The West and the Rest: Discourse and Power” by Stuart Hall.

Writing

Quote 1-2 sentences from each of the readings that you believe represent the main idea of the essays. Post your response as a comment below.

Essay 1: Final Draft

Objective: produce a revised and polished final draft of your rhetorical analysis essay. To produce your final draft, you will carefully revise and develop your formal draft using lessons and strategies learned in class and suggestions provided in my feedback. Please carefully read and follow this assignment. Do each task in order.

Estimated time: 2-3 hours
Due: Monday, March 2nd at 11:59 p.m. (electronic submission)

Reading

  1. Re-read the guidelines for the Rhetorical Analysis Essay assignment.
  2. Re-read the Model Essay. This model essay will help you understand the expectations of the assignment, along with the appropriate tone and style.

Writing / Revision / Editing / Polishing

  1. Revise your summary of “The Question of Cultural Identity.” Make sure to include Hall’s stance. See the Citing Sources Writing Guide for a refresher on how to write an effective summary.
  2. Revise your analysis paragraphs, ensuring that you have developed and expanded your analysis of the writing and rhetorical patterns in the text.
  3. Revise your claims/topic sentences for each of the analysis paragraphs, using your notes on the strategies we discussed in class. Bold your claims/topic sentences. See the Developing Strong claims writing guide.
  4. Review your paragraph order for impact and progression. Reorder as necessary.
  5. Revise and polish your introduction to introduce your ideas about how recognizing rhetorical patterns and writerly choices are helpful for your audience of freshmen readers better to understand rhetorical essays.
  6. Revise and bold your thesis.
  7. Revise and polish your conclusion to answer the “So, what?” question. Synthesize the ideas you discuss in your essay to encourage your freshmen readers to look for rhetorical patterns and writerly choices when reading theoretical texts. See the Effective Conclusions writing guide.
  8. Review your introduction and thesis. Revise as necessary.
  9. Review your two-line title. The first line should “hook” the reader, and the second line should indicate your analysis/argument.
  10. Proofread your essay to correct errors in MLA formatting, citation, grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.
  11. Include a Work Cited list on a separate page using MLA style. The complete citation for this essay is in the Model Essay, so this is not a difficult task. You may also refer to the to the MLA Sample Paper for help.
  12. Include a one-paragraph self-evaluation on a separate page in which you briefly discuss which aspect of your final draft you feel most confident about and which aspect of your final draft you feel least confident about. This self-evaluation is part of the assignment.

Submit your essay as a Word document or PDF (no Google docs or Pages files) to Dropbox by 11:59 p.m. Monday, March 2nd.

 

Exercise 1.5: Revised Thesis

Objective: to better understand the function and structure of an effective thesis.

Estimated time: 30 minutes
Due by 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, February 26th

Review the thesis in your formal draft. Write a revised thesis that has the qualities of an effective thesis as is described in the Effective Theses Writing Guide. Post your revised thesis as a comment below. You might also read  “Motivating Your Argument” by Williams and Colomb to help you with crafting and revising your introduction.